Currently viewing the tag: "resilience"
This afternoon my four little munchkins arrive home from a week away at Grandma and Grandad's farm (huge thank you to my lovely folks for having our four stay for a whole week) . I am so excited to see their little faces this afternoon and hear all about their adventures on their big trip away. How the time has flown by! It is not that long ago that we had four kids under 5 years old. A house filled with high-chairs, nappies, baby toys and cots. It reminded me of this post I wrote a few years ago when we took the kids exploring in Western Australia. The youngest two (2 and 4 years old) were determined to climb the hill with the 'big kids'. The very thought of my little poppets scrambling up a rocky hill scared the pants off me!   Yet off they went, take a look below... Enjoy xx   From the vault (29/09/2012) ****************************** Part of the deal with a large slightly chaotic life with the tribe is encouraging independence…from a very early age. This does not come easy. At all. This is not one of those things that gets easier with time. Cultivating independence takes a big risk, a lot of holding your breath, heart thumping loudly in your chest kind of moments. This was one of times. This is how you learn to climb (the under 5’s edition).

Beginning the ascent... Little L bravely charges on

Hurrah!! Little L reaches the summit (I breathe a huge sigh of relief)

Enjoy xx
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Allowing my tribe to take risk...rock climbing!It’s a familiar battleground. Homework o’clock. Understanding, encouraging, cajoling, threatening, pleading, and any other tool I have in my arsenal in an attempt to ensure the kids are receiving a good education and we are not going completely loony trying to get EVERYTHING done. One of the major quandaries I seem to be coming up against lately is finding the balance between stepping in and stepping back. Helping your kids is one thing, becoming a helicopter parent is a whole other can of worms! Where do you draw the line? Take maths. The kids now have Mathletics (an online learning portal with a bunch of tests and ‘live challenges’), worksheets and timetables to learn by rote (yep, those are still old school). Then there are the incidental maths type activities, cooking (weighing and measuring, counting, sorting… The perfectionist in me wants each of the kids to get every  question right, to have every worksheet completed, neatly and on time.  Perfectly and correctly. No mistakes. I find I have to draw a line though because it can be a slippery slope to becoming THAT parent who possibly, no definitely, completed the assignment and then got disappointed when they ‘only received a B’. I think kids need to learn what frustration, failure and pressure to get things done feels like, and they need to know it’s ok and perfectly normal. We all make mistakes sometimes, become angry when things don't go our way and frustrated when we are struggling to master a new skill. It's ok to admit that and then work through it. That's what can ultimately help us to become independent and build our confidence, and find our way. There was a great article in The Age about how we can build resilience in our kids, and how it can be a great life lesson and skill to take into adulthood. What do you think? Do you allow your kids to fail or feel disappointed?  Or do you think there is plenty of time to learn those hard lessons? Enjoy xx
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